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Jordan Morant Wolverine

July 20, 2019 | kzmwuuff | No Comments

first_imgHit the jump for more on Morant. Overall, this is an excellent pickup for Michigan. Though he’s not a 100-level player to me, he’s one of the top few safety prospects to pick the Wolverines over the last decade or so. I think Tyree Kinnel was a solid player at Michigan, even though he took some flak from fans and was not drafted, but I would put Morant somewhere about halfway between Peppers and Kinnel. Since I gave Peppers a TTB Rating of 100 and Kinnel a 74, maybe you can guess my grade for Morant… Morant has a lot of skills that will probably remind you of Jabrill Peppers. If you’re not reminded of Peppers…well, that’s okay. But his body type, his change-of-direction skills, and his playing style all remind me of the former first round pick. Morant is an excellent tackler who puts his “eyes through the thighs.” He’s strong in man coverage and can outmuscle receivers. Michigan now has thirteen public commitments in the 2020 class. Morant is the first safety prospect to commit in this class, and the second defensive back, after corner Andre Seldon, Jr. Michigan has done a great job of recruiting New Jersey over the last several years (save for a blip here or there), and Morant joins recent commit Aaron Lewis, Jr. (LINK) from the Garden State. Morant is listed at 5’11” and 212 lbs., and he runs a 4.69 forty. As a junior in 2018, he made 36 tackles, 3.5 tackles for loss, and 3 pass breakups. TTB Rating: 87 Jordan Morant (image via Twitter) RATINGSESPN: 4-star, 82 grade, #9 S, #214 overallRivals: 4-star, 5.8 grade, #20 S247 Sports: 4-star, 95 grade, #1 S, #47 overall  1 0You need to login in order to vote Oradell (NJ) Bergen Catholic safety Jordan Morant publicly committed to Michigan on Sunday. He chose the Wolverines over offers from Alabama, Clemson, Ohio State, and Penn State, among others. Thought Morant is the 247 Composite #10 safety in the country – and #1 to 247 itself – I will not be giving him a ranking of 100, which I gave to last year’s top guy (Daxton Hill) and Peppers. Though his playing style is reminiscent of the latter, Morant is not quite as explosive and doesn’t have the all-around skill. Tags: 2020 recruiting, Jordan Morant, Oradell (NJ) Bergen Catholic Morant was offered by Michigan in January of 2018, after his sophomore year; aside from maybe Virginia Tech, it was his first big-time offer. He visited Michigan unofficially in April, and we have known that the Wolverines were near the front of the pack since then. In the meantime, he stated he would be announcing his college decision at the Under Armour All-American Game in January of 2019, so we thought we would have to wait a while to find out his decision. But an official visit this weekend led to him publicly announcing his future destination.last_img read more

first_img Source:https://www.med.umn.edu/ May 2 2018The University of Minnesota is the first institution in the state to participate in the phase III clinical trial for CardiAmp Therapy. Previous clinical studies of this therapy have been promising and have shown improvements in patients’ quality of life and heart function.The CardiAMP investigational therapy is a minimally invasive treatment for ischemic heart failure which occurs after a heart attack. The therapy includes a pre-procedure screening test. A small bone marrow sample is taken and screened to identify patients with a higher likelihood of benefitting from the treatment.Related StoriesImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsMaternal proximity to oil and gas areas associated with congenital heart defects in babiesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaIf a patient with University of Minnesota Health qualifies for the therapy, additional bone marrow is collected, which is immediately processed to concentrate the cells into the therapeutic dosage. The dose is then delivered through a catheterization procedure directly into the damaged portions of the heart. Therefore, the patient’s own cells are used in a therapy designed to stimulate the body’s natural healing response.”Treatment of heart failure can be very challenging to the patient as well as for the care providers. CardiAMP is an investigational therapy using patients’ own cell lines to treat the failing heart muscle,” said Ganesh Raveendran, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, University of Minnesota Medical School. “This therapy, if proven to be successful, could complement the current treatment modalities available to the patient and eventually reduce the need for LVAD therapy and heart transplantation.”Heart failure is a serious, chronic, and progressive condition in which the heart muscle is unable to pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs, and, for which typically there is no cure. However, many people with heart failure lead full, happy lives when the condition is managed properly. In 2015, an estimated 5.7 million Americans over the age of 20 were reported to have heart failure, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). The prevalence of heart failure continues to increase due to the aging population and the increase in major cardiovascular risk factors, including obesity and diabetes.last_img read more

first_img Patient Eligibility. Healthcare providers face difficulties in determining whether patients meet criteria for admission to a particular treatment center, including the application of treatment eligibility criteria. “Eligibility requirements may prevent a patient from entering a treatment center,” the researchers write. Treatment Capacity. Even if a patient is eligible, providers have trouble finding out whether space is available. “Despite the need for services, treatment centers may not run at capacity, because of frustrations encountered and time wasted on the referral and admission process.” Knowledge of Treatment Options. Providers may not understand the levels of available care for substance use treatment, and how to select the best treatment for their patient. “After determining appropriate level of care, a provider must then find a program that meets the patient’s needs, which becomes more difficult with the differences in terminology and program guidelines.” Communication. Difficulties in communication between referring providers and treatment facilities can contribute to delays to starting treatment. The need for direct referral – “from the emergency department to a bed” – is particularly high for patients with opioid use disorders. May 9 2018For patients with substance use disorders seen in the emergency department or doctor’s office, locating and accessing appropriate treatment all too often poses difficult challenges. Healthcare providers and treatment facility administrators share their views on delays and obstacles to prompt receipt of substance use disorder treatment after referral in a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). This journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.Issues related to patient eligibility, treatment capacity, understanding of options, and communication problems all contribute to gaps in referral and delays to getting treatment for patients with substance use disorders, according to the new research by Claire Evelyn Blevins, PhD, of Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Butler Hospital, Providence, RI; Nishi Rawat, MD, of OpenBeds, Inc., Washington. DC; and Michael Stein, MD, of Boston University and Butler Hospital.Four Themes Affecting Obstacles to Treatment for Substance Use DisordersThe ongoing opioid crisis has drawn attention to the widening gap between the high need and limited access to substance use treatment in the United States. A recent Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration report found that of 21.7 million Americans in need of substance use disorder treatment, only 2.35 million received treatment at a specialty facility. Yet there is little information on the organizational-level barriers to treatment for substance use disorders.To address this issue, Dr. Blevins and colleagues performed a series of interviews with 59 stakeholders in the treatment referral process. The study gathered input from those who make referrals for substance use treatment, including emergency medicine physicians, addiction specialists, and other medical providers; as well as those who receive referrals, including substance use treatment facility staff and administrators. Analysis of the interviews identified four broad themes: Related StoriesStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgery”Access to substance use disorder treatment is often a maze that can be difficult to navigate for both providers and patients,” Dr. Blevins and coauthors write. Based on the themes identified, they make recommendations for improvement in the referral process, including a database of clear eligibility criteria, real-time information on treatment capacity, and increased education and training for providers on substance use treatment.They also propose ways to improve communication and reduce treatment waiting times, including new information technologies. The researchers write: “By improving systems that enhance communication across organizations, patient referrals may be more easily completed, improving access to care and expanding the use of appropriate treatments for the many patients in need.”In an accompanying commentary, David L. Rosenbloom, PhD, of Boston University School of Public Health discusses the underlying reasons for the current “dysfunctional referral system.” He notes that referrals for other chronic diseases “may be more effective because they are to ‘in-house’ affiliated providers.” Dr. Rosenbloom writes: “The standard of care should be to stabilize, initiate treatment, and provide a hands-on transfer to an entity that can complete a diagnostic assessment and provide evidence-based treatment” for patients with substance use disorders.center_img Source:https://www.asam.org/last_img read more

first_img Source:http://www.rsoa.org/ Jun 18 2018Alcohol dependence, and opiate, cocaine and other stimulant addictions, are all diseases of the brain that have behavioral manifestations and they are not due to criminal behavior alone or to antisocial or “weak” personality disorders. These observations and others will be shared during the 41st annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in San Diego June 17-21.”Addictive diseases depend on multiple variants of multiple genes working in concert to increase an individual’s vulnerability to developing an addiction and also self-exposure to alcohol, opiates, cocaine, or other drugs of abuse,” said Mary Jeanne Kreek, professor and head of the Laboratory of the Biology of Addictive Diseases at The Rockefeller University. “In addition, laboratory research has shown that each of these drugs of abuse – alcohol, opiates, and cocaine – cause profound changes in gene expression of multiple genes, especially of the opioid, classical neurotransmitter, and stress-responsive systems, which result in changes in behaviors.”Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingKreek will make her comments at the RSA plenary on June 17.”I also want to emphasize three points regarding the devastating current opioid crisis in the U.S.,” said Kreek. “One, physicians should prescribe a maximum of one week of opiates for relief of acute pain. Only one to three days is needed in most patients, not three weeks as is currently prescribed. Two, naloxone – a safe but short-acting treatment for a suspected opiate overdose – should be available at an affordable price to not only medical personnel, but also first responders, families and others who interact with people using or addicted to opiates. Three, the two extremely effective treatments for opiate addiction – methadone maintenance pharmacotherapy and buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance – should be made far more widely available throughout our country, and the excessively stringent regulations governing methadone maintenance treatment should be relaxed at federal and state levels.”Kreek added that specific medications for treatment of specific addictive diseases should be used much more extensively. “Both naltrexone, approved in the U.S., and nalmefene, approved in Europe, are effective in 20 to 40 percent of alcoholic patients, and especially effective in alcoholic persons with one or two copies of the “A118G” variant of the mu opioid receptor,” she said. While pharmacotherapeutic options for cocaine and other stimulants do not presently exist, her lab is currently synthesizing potential treatments for both alcoholism and cocaine dependency.last_img read more

first_img Source:https://www.asynt.com/press-releases/lab-safety-shields/ Jun 29 2018Asynt has expanded its range of Lab Safety Shields. Manufactured in the UK, Asynt Lab Safety Shields fit neatly around all major stirrer hotplate brands providing lab scientists with enhanced safety while maintaining easy access to hotplate controls and good all-round visibility of the reaction or process.Related StoriesCondensyn waterless condenser provides benefits to synthetic chemistry labsAsynt’s DrySyn OCTO Mini reaction helps optimize biocatalytic hydrogenationAsynt introduces new, easy-to-use entry level flow chemistry reactorBuilt in robust 5 mm polycarbonate, the new Large Lab Safety Shield offers additional user protection for applications such as heated parallel reactions, especially those requiring user intervention when the fume hood sash is open. The device also shields reactions from the cooling effect of fume hood ventilation.Compactly designed (29.5 x 16 x 17 cm) to minimize use of valuable fume hood space, Asynt’s budget-priced Standard Lab Safety Shield fits neatly around the stirrer hotplate to provide robust, convenient protection from splashes, aerosols and spills.All Asynt Lab Safety Shields are resistant to a wide range of laboratory solvents and temperatures up to 170 °C.For specialist applications – Asynt has the engineering and design expertise to also produce custom Lab Safety Shield’s optimized to your experimental set-up.last_img read more

first_imgMr Dentith said the names of the practices involved in the testing would be announced shortly. He said the company would be interested to roll the technology out to further GP practices in the future.Last year, the Now Healthcare Group became the UK’s first digital health provider to be assured by the Care Quality Commission to meet all requirements within the new enhanced digital guidelines, with no areas for improvement.Patients commented on the “great service” and stated that the GPs were “professional, knowledgeable, caring and fantastic.” Sep 11 2018GP practices across the UK are being offered the chance to trial technology to allow patients to book appointments and take part in video consultations by leading digital health company, Now Healthcare Group. I am extremely proud to announce our latest ground-breaking proposition. Finally, digital health and NHS GP practices, can work collaboratively to strengthen patient support – at no cost whatsoever. We are offering an evolution of a traditional way to see a GP for all NHS patients by using NHS funds already in the system. Our technology assists patients because it gives GPs the opportunity to continue to see their patients – rather than losing them to other practices offering online consultation services.”Lee Dentith, CEO and Founder, Now Healthcare Group Now Healthcare Group (NHG), plans to offer its bespoke technology (which cost £5m to develop) as a FREE trial, launching with five groups of NHS practices and one ‘very large’ practice in England in the next two months.It will also offer patients the chance to use its app-driven, repeat medicine delivery service, which is also free to NHS patients.NHG is a private company, which currently offers private online GP consultations through its app, ‘Now GP’.It recently launched a £1.5million ‘super-hub’ digital Pharmacy, ‘Now Pharmacy’ – with the aim of dispensing and delivering up to 500,00 repeat medications per month.center_img We will also offer practices the chance to use our own GPs, free of charge, to carry out additional video consultations – such as for evening appointments – with a view to driving more people to use our app. We will look to work with practices to utilise their GPs for a couple of hours a week and do multiple (virtual consultations) or they can use our GPs (depending on how many patients from their practice we fulfil their medication needs). Best of all, it is completely free of charge.” Now Healthcare Group’s digital Pharmacy has been highlighted as a game-changer for millions of people living with long-term health conditions – who need numerous medications.Related StoriesNew Digital GP Service from Aviva and Now HealthcareNew digital pharmacy aims to help people living with chronic care conditionsIt is also a life-saver for those who have been affected by local Pharmacy cuts and/or struggle to travel to their Pharmacy to collect their prescriptions.The technology offered to GP practices will include an option for patients to select Now Healthcare Group’s prescription delivery service but will also allow them to choose another pharmacy for dispensing their medication, if preferred.This means the arrangement will not put GPs at risk of breaching ‘prescription direction’ regulations, which prevent them from sending their patients to specific pharmacies for their medicines.last_img read more

Doubts Shroud Big Bang Discovery

July 20, 2019 | kzmwuuff | No Comments

Two months ago, a team of cosmologists reported that it had spotted the first direct evidence that the newborn universe underwent a mind-boggling exponential growth spurt known as inflation. But a new analysis suggests the signal, a subtle pattern in the afterglow of the big bang, or cosmic microwave background, could be an artifact produced by dust within our own galaxy.For the full story, see this week’s issue of Science.

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe For all that Charles Darwin figured out about life on earth, he was perpetually perplexed by flowering plants, calling their explosive evolution an “abominable mystery.” Now, a newly analyzed fossil species has shed light on where these plants, known as angiosperms, may have gotten their start. In water is the surprising suggestion.For years botanists thought that angiosperms, which came to dominate the terrestrial landscape 160 million years ago, had arisen on dry land as they evolved from existing land plants. Bolstering the idea was the discovery in 1999 that a tiny land-dwelling shrub called Amborella sits at the base of the angiosperm family tree. “The consensus is that [flowering plants] originated on land and moved into water,” says Michael Donoghue, an evolutionary biologist at Yale University.But David Dilcher, a paleobotanist at Indiana University, Bloomington, is now questioning that consensus. After an intense investigation of more than 1000 specimens of the fossil plant Montsechia vidalii, he and a team of researchers have concluded that the 125-million-year-old water dwellers are close relatives of the foxtail plant, a modern angiosperm. The connection between this fossil and the foxtail, as well as evidence from other ancient water plants, indicates that early on—perhaps at their very beginnings—angiosperms thrived in freshwater lakes and ponds, they suggest today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Since Montsechia’s discovery in rock deposits in Spain 150 years ago, botanists have classified it as a horsetail, a conifer, a tropical evergreen tree, and a liverwort, before finally deciding it was a flowering plant. To better understand these fossils, Dilcher and colleagues spent 6 years painstakingly dissolving the limestone surrounding them, revealing intricate structures beneath. The fossil species and current foxtail plants appear to share many of the same traits, Dilcher says. For example, analysis indicated that they are both pollinated underwater. Once released, their pollen sink and grow tubes, one of which eventually links to a hole in the female’s seed-bearing structure, where fertilization occurs and the seed and fruit form.This kinship with foxtail is intriguing, says Dilcher, because in the 1990s, foxtails were widely considered to be at the base of the flowering plants family tree. Then, molecular studies caused them and water lilies—another contender for the base—to give up their title to Amborella.  Dilcher argues it’s time to reassess this assumption about Amborella using new morphological and molecular data.Based on the Montsechia analysis, he wonders whether angiosperms made their first appearance in water. Two things in particular urge him on. If the close connection to Montsechia is true, then the foxtails would be 10 million years older than previously thought, he says, placing them closer to the time when angiosperms originated. In addition, other ancient aquatic angiosperms arose independently around the same time as Montsechia. Water lilies, for example, first made their appearance in Portugal about 125 million years ago. And another “first flower” contender—also an aquatic angiosperm—arose in China 125 million years ago, as Dilcher and his colleagues described in 1998.Dilcher’s most recent work “demonstrates that aquatic angiosperms lived at the same time in very different regions of the Earth, [and that] adaptation to freshwater occurred early in angiosperm evolution,” says Pamela Soltis, a plant biologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville, who was not involved with the work. “The paper offers fresh evidence that early angiosperms invaded freshwater aquatic habitats,” agrees Taylor Feild, a botanist at James Cook University in Townsville, Australia. But he’s not convinced that flowering plants called water their first home. As he and others point out, even though land plants are just as old, aquatic plants are much more likely to be preserved in the fossil record, creating a potential bias.Soltis, too, is skeptical that angiosperms started in water, but she says she is willing to keep an open mind. Finding more fossils of aquatic flowering plants and placing those fossils in the family tree “will tell us whether the first angiosperms were aquatic or terrestrial.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country alxpin/iStockphoto Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Another Chinese team, from Guangzhou Medical University, in March became the first to report repairing disease-causing mutations in viable embryos, but some still contained a patchy mix of edited cells—a phenomenon called mosaicism. In none of the Chinese efforts did the researchers go on to implant the manipulated embryos in women.Sources familiar with the new work from Mitalipov’s group told the MIT Technology Review that they had produced tens of successfully edited embryos, and had avoided the issue of mosaicism by injecting eggs with CRISPR right as they were fertilized with donor sperm. The Guangzhou team injected its CRISPR system into single-celled human embryos—it’s not yet clear how much their timing differed from Mitalipov’s. (The new research presumably relied on nonfederal government funding, since Congress prohibits the use of taxpayer funds on research that destroys human embryos.)Concerns about mosaicism and off-target effects after the published work by the Chinese teams led some to conclude that CRISPR wasn’t safe as a strategy for preventing a disease in a baby, much less adding some “enhancement.” But even with the apparent advance by the Oregon team, a U.S. clinical trial probably isn’t imminent. “It’s noteworthy that … they’ve been able to make some of these claims,” offers Michael Werner, executive director of the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine in Washington, D.C., who argued in a 2015 Nature commentary that ethical and safety issues should put germline editing research off limits. “It’s still a little premature to say that we’ve resolved all these safety issues now.”The NAS report notes that many inherited diseases can be prevented by selecting healthy embryos for in vitro fertilization, and that embryo editing might only be justified if it presents the only option for a couple to have a healthy biological child. Congress has meanwhile prohibited the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from reviewing applications for clinical trials involving embryo editing. Since Chinese researchers announced the first gene editing of a human embryo 2 years ago, many expected that similar work in the United States was inevitable. Last night, the MIT Technology Review broke the news that such experiments have happened. The research, led by embryologist Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, also reportedly sidestepped problems of incomplete and off-target editing that plagued previous attempts, though details could not be confirmed since the work is not yet published and Mitalipov has so far declined to comment.If a peer-reviewed paper bears out the news story, “It’s one more step on the path to potential clinical application,” says bioethicist Jeffrey Kahn of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, who served on a committee convened by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Medicine in Washington, D.C., to address gene editing. The panel’s report earlier this year concluded that a clinical trial involving embryo editing would be ethically allowable under narrow circumstances.The first published human embryo–editing work, in 2015, used nonviable embryos and targeted a gene mutated in the heritable blood disorder beta thalassemia. But it revealed major shortcomings in applying the increasingly popular CRISPR gene-editing technology. The few embryos that took up the change made by CRISPR were a patchwork of edited and unchanged cells, and they bore unintended edits outside the targeted gene. A U.S. research team has reportedly edited the DNA of a human embryo just as a sperm fertilizes an egg, well before its eight-cell stage.center_img By Kelly ServickJul. 27, 2017 , 2:30 PM Email First U.S. team to gene-edit human embryos revealed Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

first_img By Katie LanginMar. 8, 2018 , 2:01 PM Tweets containing false news (depicted in orange in this data visualization) spread to more people through Twitter than tweets containing true news (teal). The main impetus for the new research was the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. The lead author—Soroush Vosoughi, a data scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge—says after the attack a lot of the stuff he was reading on social media was false. There were rumors that a student from Brown University, who had gone missing, was suspected by the police. But later, people found out that he had nothing to do with the attack and had committed suicide (for reasons unrelated to the bombing).That’s when Vosoughi realized that “these rumors aren’t just fun things on Twitter, they really can have effects on people’s lives and hurt them really badly.” A Ph.D. student at the time, he switched his research to focus on the problem of detecting and characterizing the spread of misinformation on social media.He and his colleagues collected 12 years of data from Twitter, starting from the social media platform’s inception in 2006. Then they pulled out tweets related to news that had been investigated by six independent fact-checking organizations—websites like PolitiFact, Snopes, and FactCheck.org. They ended up with a data set of 126,000 news items that were shared 4.5 million times by 3 million people, which they then used to compare the spread of news that had been verified as true with the spread of stories shown to be false. They found that whereas the truth rarely reached more than 1000 Twitter users, the most pernicious false news stories—like the Mayweather tale—routinely reached well over 10,000 people. False news propagated faster and wider for all forms of news—but the problem was particularly evident for political news, the team reports today in Science.At first the researchers thought that bots might be responsible, so they used sophisticated bot-detection technology to remove social media shares generated by bots. But the results didn’t change: False news still spread at roughly the same rate and to the same number of people. By default, that meant that human beings were responsible for the virality of false news.That got the scientists thinking about the people involved. It occurred to them that Twitter users who spread false news might have more followers. But that turned out to be a dead end: Those people had fewer followers, not more.Finally the team decided to look more closely at the tweets themselves. As it turned out, tweets containing false information were more novel—they contained new information that a Twitter user hadn’t seen before—than those containing true information. And they elicited different emotional reactions, with people expressing greater surprise and disgust. That novelty and emotional charge seem to be what’s generating more retweets. “If something sounds crazy stupid you wouldn’t think it would get that much traction,” says Alex Kasprak, a fact-checking journalist at Snopes in Pasadena, California. “But those are the ones that go massively viral.”The research gives you a sense of how much of a problem fake news is, both because of its scale and because of our own tendencies to share misinformation, says David Lazer, a computational social scientist at Northeastern University in Boston who co-wrote a policy perspective on the science of fake news that was also published today in Science. He thinks that, in the short term, the “Facebooks, Googles, and Twitters of the world” need to do more to implement safeguards to reduce the magnitude of the problem. But in the long term we also need more science, he says—because if we don’t understand where fake news comes from and how it spreads, then how can we possibly combat it? Fake news spreads faster than true news on Twitter—thanks to people, not bots Credits: (Image) Peter Beshai; (Data) Soroush Vosoughi, Deb Roy, and Sinan Aral Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) During the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the internet was abuzz with discussion when reports surfaced that Floyd Mayweather wore a hijab to a Donald Trump rally, daring people to fight him. The concocted story started on a sports comedy website, but it quickly spread on social media—and people took it seriously.From Russian “bots” to charges of fake news, headlines are awash in stories about dubious information going viral. You might think that bots—automated systems that can share information online—are to blame. But a new study shows that people are the prime culprits when it comes to the propagation of misinformation through social networks. And they’re good at it, too: Tweets containing falsehoods reach 1500 people on Twitter six times faster than truthful tweets, the research reveals.Bots are so new that we don’t have a clear sense of what they’re doing and how big of an impact they’re making, says Shawn Dorius, a social scientist at Iowa State University in Ames who wasn’t involved in the research. We generally think that bots distort the types of information that reaches the public, but—in this study at least—they don’t seem to be skewing the headlines toward false news, he notes. They propagated true and false news roughly equally.last_img read more

first_img iStock.com/PeopleImages Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Tania RabesandratanaSep. 12, 2018 , 7:01 PM Email Universities are worse than drug companies at reporting clinical trial resultscenter_img A study finds that 89% of clinical trials run by universities and registered in an EU database do not have their results reported as quickly as is mandated. Drug companies have taken a lot of heat over the years for not promptly reporting results from clinical trials, but a new study suggests academics may be even worse. Nearly nine in 10 university clinical studies fail to report results in the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) within the required 1-year time frame, a team from the Evidence-Based Medicine DataLab at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom reports today in The BMJ.Sharing the methods and results of all trials is “an ethical and scientific imperative,” the authors say. EU guidelines require that results be published in the EUCTR 12 months after a registered trial ends, but there is no legal basis for the European Medicines Agency (EMA), which runs the register, to impose penalties on laggards.Compliance is low across the board and particularly poor at universities. In January, the Oxford team downloaded records for all 31,821 trials registered in the EUCTR since 2004. Overall, about half of the 7274 trials that were due to report results at the time of the study complied, the researchers found. Only 11% of university-led trials in the study complied with the 1-year mandate, compared with 68% of ones run by companies. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Oxford’s Ben Goldacre, who co-founded the AllTrials campaign in 2013 to boost clinical data sharing, led the study. “We hope that our data will help trial sponsors to move fast and get their houses in order,” he said in a statement that also slammed “bad excuses from trialists.” In the same statement, Síle Lane, head of international campaigns and policy at Sense about Science, a charity in London that runs AllTrials, called for clinical trial funders and ethics committees to prohibit noncompliant institutions from running new trials.The paper lists worst offenders, including the Charité University Hospital in Berlin and the Ludwig-Maximilian University (LMU) Hospital in Munich, Germany, as well as Sweden’s Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Together, the three centers owed results on 110 trials and had reported none, the paper says. (The reporting data are updated regularly on EU Trials Tracker, a new public website launched by the Oxford team.) In The BMJ study, Goldacre and co-authors also flag “extensive evidence” of missing and contradictory data in EUCTR entries.The responsibility for reporting results to the EUCTR lies with individual researchers, an LMU spokesperson tells ScienceInsider. They add that the university is planning to put tools in place to help researchers comply with the EU requirements.A few academic institutions have achieved high compliance rates, in particular the University of Dundee (82% of trials with results reported within 1 year) in the United Kingdom and the University of Oxford (77%).But reporting tasks “cannot be just thrust on researchers and universities,” says Jacob George, director of R&D at the United Kingdom’s National Health Service Tayside and professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Dundee, who is responsible for his institution’s good showing. George says reading about low trial reporting rates in an AllTrials report about 3 years ago prompted him to take action. “I must have spent 100 hours chasing up investigators myself” to tackle the backlog at his university, he tells ScienceInsider. George says he also secured funding for a temporary, half-time employee who will work on internal processes to improve reporting in the long term.  Reporting can be cumbersome, for instance, when a researcher moves to another job after working on a clinical trial. George says researchers also need trial funders to provide funding that matches their declared transparency goals, as well as formal reassurance from journals that posting results in registries does not preclude publication of peer-reviewed articles.The European Union’s 2014 Clinical Trial Regulation, which comes into effect next year, will tighten requirements for reporting results. The regulation provides a clear legal obligation, rather than mere guidance, and allows member states to lay down rules for penalties in case of infringements.For now, EMA says it is developing a system to flag overdue trials. “We need to reflect on how we can improve our communication with academic sponsors and smaller sponsor organizations,” says Fergus Sweeney, EMA’s head of inspections, human medicines pharmacovigilance and committees in London. “This study helps to spread the word on how important it is to post trial results once a clinical trial is over.”last_img read more

first_img By Katie CameroJun. 28, 2019 , 11:20 AM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Aviation’s dirty secret: Airplane contrails are a surprisingly potent cause of global warming NurPhoto/Contributor/Getty Images The aviation industry has long been criticized for its large environmental footprint, particularly its climate-warming carbon emissions. But a new study suggests that another byproduct of airplanes—the white contrails they paint across the sky—has an even bigger warming effect, one that is set to triple by 2050.  Planes create their mesmerizing contrails as they soar high in the thin, cold air. Water vapor quickly condenses around soot from the plane’s exhaust and freezes to form cirrus clouds, which can last for minutes or hours. These high-flying clouds are too thin to reflect much sunlight, but ice crystals inside them can trap heat. Unlike low-level clouds that have a net cooling effect, these contrail-formed clouds warm the climate.A 2011 study suggests that the net effect of these contrail clouds contributes more to atmospheric warming than all the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by planes since the dawn of aviation. And those effects are predicted to get worse as air traffic—and the resulting cloud coverage—increases: Some estimates suggest global air traffic will quadruple by the year 2050. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Plane contrails have been found to increase heat in the upper atmosphere. Email One of the researchers from the 2011 study wanted to explore how contrail clouds could affect the climate in the future. Along with colleagues, atmospheric physicist Ulrike Burkhardt from the German Aerospace Center’s (DLR’s) Institute for Atmospheric Physics in Wessling created a new atmospheric model that—for the first time—gave contrail clouds their own category, separate from natural clouds. That allowed them to model particular qualities of the humanmade clouds that affected everything from their formation to how they interacted with the rest of the atmosphere.The researchers modeled the effect of global contrail cloud coverage in 2006, a year for which they had accurate aviation data. Then, taking into account predictions for future air traffic and emissions, they modeled the effect of contrail clouds for 2050. They found a threefold increase in their warming effect over that time, they report this week in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.The study is one of the first to make a detailed prediction of how these special clouds affect the future climate, says DLR cloud physicist Bernd Kärcher, who was a co-author on the 2011 paper. He says the new cloud classification scheme was crucial to the model and its results.The researchers looked at another scenario for 2050, one with a 50% reduction in airplane soot emissions. They found that such a reduction could lead to a 15% decrease in the contrail clouds’ atmospheric warming effect.But little is known about the relationship between climate warming and cloud coverage, and how atmospheric warming affects temperatures on the surface. What researchers do know is that high levels of soot lead to more and longer-lived contrail cirrus clouds, which could alter weather and climate at the surface, Burkhardt says. However, she adds, even a 90% reduction in soot emissions with the help of cleaner aircraft fuels would fail to bring the cloud’s climate impact back to its 2006 levels.A more likely scenario, Burkhardt says, is that levels of soot and contrail cirrus clouds will continue to rise. That’s because most aviation regulations and pollution-reduction plans fail to consider the climate impact from anything other than CO2 emissions. A United Nations scheme, for example, requires all signatory nations to keep their CO2 emissions under a certain level, and report them annually, but says nothing about the climate impact from contrails.Burkhardt says that considering contrails in such schemes would be difficult, however, because climate impact varies based on weather, location, and time of day. One solution, Burkhardt says, is to reroute flights. However, such rerouting may force planes to burn more fuel and release more CO2. She says it would be better to find more efficient fuels that release less soot. But with the likely increase in air traffic, even that might not be enough.Andrew Gettelman, a cloud physicist with the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, says contrail cirrus clouds are a complex problem, but that their warming effect is still small compared with the overall amounts of CO2 belched by society. “If all we had were contrails, there wouldn’t be global warming.” But, he adds, it’s still important for the aviation industry to understand the science and “get their impact right.”last_img read more

first_imgDecember 3, 2018 By Linda Kor The season of celebration was apparent at Winslow’s La Posada Hotel where the city’s annual Festival of Trees was hosted last week. These beautiful trees are decorated by local clubs, organizations andSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Winslow’s Festival of Trees brings holiday cheerlast_img

first_img Related News Erdogan says Turkish central bank chief ousted for refusing rate cuts Advertising More Explained Two hours after polls closed, Erdogan’s preferred candidate, Binali Yildirim, conceded defeat on national television. Erdogan acknowledged the result an hour later.“The national will was manifested today one more time,” the Turkish president said on Twitter. Referring to the opposition candidate, he wrote, “I congratulate Ekrem Imamoglu, who won the election, according to unofficial results.”The ANKA news agency reported that with all votes counted, Imamoglu led with 54%, compared with 45% for Yildirim. The semiofficial Anadolu Agency showed a similar result with 99% of the votes counted.Read More | Istanbul residents vote in mayoral re-run, in key test for Turkish democracy, Erdogan Lawyers from both campaigns said they had agreed on new lists of polling station officials, all certified public officials, to prevent a repeat of the accusations that caused the March 31 election to be annulled. Post Comment(s) By New York Times |Istanbul | Updated: June 24, 2019 12:01:49 pm In addition to acknowledging the result on Twitter, Erdogan, in other Twitter posts, sought to move the agenda beyond the election, saying he would be attending to foreign and domestic issues at the Group of 20 summit, which will be in Osaka, Japan, and during a meeting with China, and at a South European and Balkans summit meeting.He told international journalists last week that he thought his rapport with Trump should be enough to ease a disagreement over his purchase of the Russian S-400 missile system and possibly avoid sanctions. But this election result could well change the dynamics of that meeting.In Istanbul, opposition supporters whistled as they caught the results on their cellphones at outdoor cafes. A car raced through the streets with its horn honking, like after a soccer match.Istanbul, Istanbul election, Istanbul re-election, Istanbul mayor election, Istanbul re-election, Istanbul mayor re election, Turkey, Tayyip Erdogan, Republican People's Party, AK Party, Ekrem Imamoglu, World news, Indian Expres news Imamoglu was backed by an alliance of opposition parties, united by their rejection of Erdogan’s increasingly authoritarian grip on Turkey. (Reuters)Imamoglu celebrated late Sunday night before a huge crowd in the park of his home district, Beylikduzu, where he has served as mayor for the past five years. Families were out with small children, and groups broke out in dancing.“We will build democracy in the city, we will build justice,” Imamoglu said. “Nobody’s lifestyle and how they dress is a concern for us. We came to embrace everyone.”“I thank the president and my opponent who congratulated me,” he said. “We will make the nation embrace each other. We will succeed in this despite everything.”The vote “shows democracy is resilient and elections still matter,” said Soner Cagaptay, the director of the Turkish Research Program at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. “Imamoglu won with a landslide — a 10-point lead — even though Erdogan mobilized all the state resources in this election.”The mood had been tense in Istanbul during the day as people voted.“The cancellation of the vote was completely unlawful and illegal,” Hatice Eksioglu said of the earlier election. “I am certain that he will win, but I am afraid,” she said, referring to Erdogan.Imamoglu, 49, was backed by an alliance of opposition parties, united by their rejection of Erdogan’s increasingly authoritarian grip on Turkey.Also Read | Explained: What is at stake in Istanbul’s election re-run?Imamoglu won the vote on March 31 by a small margin. But Erdogan’s Justice and Development Party, or AKP, contested the results, and the High Election Council ordered the do-over.While Erdogan has acquired broad powers under a new presidential system and controls all of the levers of power, a degree of democracy has remained as he has always sought legitimacy through the ballot box and assured citizens of the integrity of the process.Besides the blow to Erdogan’s image and prestige, the loss of Istanbul has practical political consequences, analysts said. The city is Erdogan’s home and political base, where he began his political career as mayor.“Losing Istanbul would mean losing a significant revenue source for AKP’s political machinery, ranging from subsidies to the party faithful to construction contracts and funds for pro-government media,” Asli Aydintasbas, a senior fellow with the European Council for Foreign Relations, said before the vote.“It would set off a chain reaction that can herald early elections later this year or in 2020,” she said.Former President Abdullah Gul and former Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu are both committed to breaking away and starting their own conservative movements, Aydintasbas said.Ozgur Unluhisarcikli, the Ankara director for the German Marshall Fund of the United States, a research organization, predicted before the election that the AKP would grudgingly accept the results. But he said the party would seek to manage the change of power in Istanbul by “hollowing out the powers of metropolitan mayors in time.”Erdogan grew up in a working-class district on the Golden Horn in Istanbul and embarked on his political career as a popular and energetic mayor of the city in the 1990s.The city has remained in the hands of his party ever since, and he transformed it with extensive infrastructure projects and grandiose signature constructions, including a vast hilltop mosque, high-rise towers, and expanding suburbs.But Erdogan’s popularity in Istanbul, which derived largely from delivering services to city residents, has waned in recent years as the construction boom has stalled and the economy has slipped into recession, although growth rebounded somewhat earlier this year.Unemployment and inflation have angered Turkish voters and cost Erdogan several of the largest cities, including the capital, Ankara, in local elections in March.Istanbul, Istanbul election, Istanbul re-election, Istanbul mayor election, Istanbul re-election, Istanbul mayor re election, Turkey, Tayyip Erdogan, Republican People's Party, AK Party, Ekrem Imamoglu, World news, Indian Expres news Erdogan’s popularity in Istanbul, which derived largely from delivering services to city residents, has waned in recent years as the construction boom has stalled and the economy has slipped into recession (Presidential Press Service via AP, Pool)“Erdogan lost his magic touch,” said Cagaptay, the analyst. “Erdogan was this politician who came from the other side of the tracks, representing the voice of the common man, the pious, the dispossessed, making this his brand for nearly two decades. That is gone.”Imamoglu has been compared to a young Erdogan because he comes from the same Black Sea region known for its fighting spirit and for his personable and energetic attitude. He won voters’ support by offering a clean and all-embracing administration, tapping into a general weariness with the governing party and complaints of corruption and cronyism.He promised that municipal workers’ jobs would be secure and that his administration would be nonpartisan.“Nothing sticks to Imamoglu,” Cagaptay said. “He became the new Erdogan.”Yildirim has been a close ally of Erdogan’s throughout his career, holding posts like transportation minister and prime minister and, most recently, president of Parliament. He had seemed a reluctant candidate in the March campaign, but after the shock of losing, he adopted a new campaign style, meeting people on squares and in neighborhoods, and emphasizing his years of experience and knowledge.The opposition faced an uneven playing field throughout both mayoral campaigns, with Erdogan maintaining control over the mainstream news media and blatantly using government and municipal resources to support his candidate.A week before the election, the two candidates faced off in a live television debate — first Turkey had witnessed in 17 years — though it did not seem to tip the balance definitively. Imamoglu remained narrowly ahead in the polls.Tensions rose in the final days before Sunday’s vote as Erdogan excoriated the opposition candidate while never uttering his name, and blasted the Republican People’s Party as undemocratic and the source of years of discrimination against religiously conservative citizens.“What we have been having since March is a psychological war,” Ilayda Kocoglu, a spokeswoman for the Imamoglu campaign, said ahead of Sunday’s vote.Istanbul, Istanbul election, Istanbul re-election, Istanbul mayor election, Istanbul re-election, Istanbul mayor re election, Turkey, Tayyip Erdogan, Republican People's Party, AK Party, Ekrem Imamoglu, World news, Indian Expres news Unemployment and inflation have angered Turkish voters and cost Erdogan several of the largest cities, including the capital, Ankara, in local elections in March. (File)On Thursday night, Erdogan ramped up the pressure, warning that even if the opposition candidate won the mayorship, legal action could remove him from office for an insult that Imamoglu allegedly made to a regional governor during a recent argument.“If the justice decides, his mayorship will be revoked,” Erdogan said in a live television interview on Thursday night. Imamoglu has denied uttering any insult.Both of the main campaigns fielded ranks of lawyers to watch the voting at every ballot box across the municipality. Opposition lawyers went through an exhaustive training in the weeks before the election and were told to avoid arguments over the ballot box but to make written objections for every irregularity. Turkey’s Erdogan says S-400 systems will be delivered within 10 days: reports How a message of unity and mistakes by Erdogan tipped the Istanbul election After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield “As of now, my competitor Imamoglu is leading,” Yildirim said in his concession speech on television. “I congratulate him, wish him success. I wish our friend Ekrem Imamoglu will bring good services to Istanbul.”Officials from the main opposition party, the People’s Republican Party, said they did not expect Erdogan’s party to challenge the result at the High Election Council because Yildirim had conceded so early.Appearing at a news conference on Sunday evening, Imamoglu said that “16 million Istanbul residents refreshed our belief in democracy and confidence in justice.”He also called on Erdogan to work with him. “I am ready to work with you in harmony,” Imamoglu said. “I put myself up for that, and I announce this in front of all Istanbul people.” President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey suffered the biggest defeat of his political career Sunday as his candidate for Istanbul mayor conceded defeat in a repeat election.The result in the do-over — held after Erdogan’s party lost and contested the first vote — wrests control over Turkey’s largest city from Erdogan and ends his party’s 25-year dominance there. Opponents say such a loss cracks the president’s aura of invincibility, showing that his grip on power after 16 years is weakening.The defeat also puts Erdogan in a diminished position at a time of tense relations with the United States and other countries as he heads to the Group of 20 summits next week, where he is planning to have talks on the sidelines with President Donald Trump to address various disagreements. Advertising Best Of Express Advertising Istanbul, Istanbul election, Istanbul re-election, Istanbul mayor election, Istanbul re-election, Istanbul mayor re election, Turkey, Tayyip Erdogan, Republican People's Party, AK Party, Ekrem Imamoglu, World news, Indian Expres news The defeat also puts Erdogan in a diminished position at a time of tense relations with the United States and other countries as he heads to the Group of 20 summits next week, (The New York Times)Written By Carlotta Gall Taking stock of monsoon rain last_img read more

first_img Explosion in southern town in Sweden injures 25, cause unclear Related News Sweden rejects China’s request to extradite ex-official Qiao Jianjun People in Sweden switch to trains to deter global warming The small plane designed to carry parachutists crashed on an island on the Ume river shortly after take off, police spokesman Peder Jonsson said, adding the cause for the accident was unknown. He said those on board were on a skydiving trip.The region’s main University Hospital of Umea confirmed there were no survivors and relatives of the deceased had been notified.Neither Jonsson nor the hospital immediately identified the victims’ names or nationalities. By Reuters |Stockholm | Published: July 15, 2019 9:51:19 am Advertising Sweden, Sweden news, Sweden crash, plane crash, Skydiving, skydiving sweden, skydiving news, Sweded skydiving aircrash, indian express, latest  news Emergency services attend the accident site at a small harbor at Ume river, outside Umea, Sweden, Sunday July 14, 2019. Swedish officials say a small plane carrying parachutists crashed in northern Sweden and all nine of the people on board were killed. (Samuel Pettersson/TT via AP)Nine people were killed when their plane crashed during a skydiving trip near Umea, a small university city in northern Sweden, authorities said on Sunday. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

first_img Advertising Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Tinaikar arrived in South Sudan capital Juba on July 6 and assumed charge as the UNMISS Force Commander.“I am confident that with your full support, we will be able to achieve the mandate that has been assigned to us. I know the difficulties of the mandate but I don’t think anything is so difficult that you cannot achieve it with effort, patience and perseverance,” Tinaikar said in a video posted by the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS).UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres had announced the appointment of 57-year-old Tinaikar in May. By PTI |United Nations | Published: July 9, 2019 12:53:38 pm 1 Comment(s) Advertising Related News UN Mission Force commander, south sudan, Lieutenant General Shailesh Sadashiv Tinaikar, UHNMISS, united nations, world news, indian express Tinaikar arrived in South Sudan capital Juba on July 6 and assumed charge as the UNMISS Force Commander. (AP)Decorated Indian Army officer Lieutenant General Shailesh Sadashiv Tinaikar, who will be leading about 15,000 troops as the newly appointed Force Commander of the UN mission in war-ravaged South Sudan, has encouraged peacekeepers to achieve their mandate and overcome difficulties with patience and perseverance. Fallujah violence: Iraq to probe human rights violations as thousands flee city in two days center_img NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home A crisis of solidarity “Lieutenant General Shailesh Sadashiv Tinaikar from #India has today, 6 July, arrived and taken up the position as Force Commander at #UNMISS #SouthSudan. May the force be with him,” the UNMISS tweeted.In another tweet, the UN mission said Tinaikar was officially welcomed by a guard of honour.The UNMISS video said after 34 years of distinguished service with the Indian armed forces, Tinaikar will take responsibility for leading almost 15,000 troops as “they work to protect civilians, provide a safe environment for displaced families returning to their homes and to support the fragile peace process as South Sudan recovers from a six-year Civil War”.The video shows Tinaikar inspecting the guard of honour, formally taking charge as Force Commander and interacting with UN peacekeepers and personnel from other nations deployed with the mission. Best Of Express Pakistan hub of terrorism, spreads false narrative about Kashmir: India at UN In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Tinaikar has had a long and distinguished career with the Indian Army spanning over three decades. He graduated from the Indian Military Academy in 1983. Before arriving in South Sudan, he had been Commandant of The Infantry School since July 2018.He previously served as the Additional Director General of Military Operations at Army Headquarters from 2017 to 2018. From 2012 to 2017, he commanded a division, a recruit training centre and a brigade, among other appointments within the Indian Armed Forces.He has been awarded the Sena Medal and the Vishisht Seva Medal for Distinguished Service.From 1996 to 1997, he served in the United Nations Angola Verification Mission III, and from 2008 to 2009, in the United Nations Mission in Sudan. He holds a Master of Philosophy (M Phil) in Defence and Strategic Studies from The University of Madras, India, awarded in December 2014.As of March 2019, India is the second highest troop contributor to UNMISS, with 2,337 troops deployed with the mission. In addition, India contributes 22 police personnel to UNMISS.last_img read more

first_imgThe deceased have been identified as 30-year-old Ranjit Mandal and 35-year-old Shanichar Yadav, Sangrampur police station officer-in-charge Suresh Prasad said.The two labourers were hired by one Vibhishan Sharma to clean the well in his residence, Prasad said.The police officer said that the State Disaster Response Force (SDRF) personnel fished out the bodies from the well late on Sunday night.The bodies have been sent to Munger Sadar Hospital for post-mortem examination. By PTI |Munger | Published: July 15, 2019 4:04:32 pm Nitish Kumar calls Bihar AES deaths ‘unfortunate,’ says expressing grief not enough Related News Heavy rain in Nepal leads to flood in several Bihar districts Bihar, Bihar labourers, Bihar labourers death, Bihar Death, Bihar state Disaster Response force, Bihar Sangrampur Bazaar area, Bihar munger, Bihar news, Indian Express The two labourers had gone to clean well at a house in the Sangrampur area, according to the town police station officer-in-charge. (Representational Image)Two labourers died of asphyxiation after entering a well in Bihar’s Munger district to clean it, police said Monday. The incident occurred at Sangrampur Bazaar area on Sunday evening. Rajiv Pratap Rudy targets tourism ministry for no move on projects in Bihar Advertising Post Comment(s)last_img read more

first_imgCats Out of the Cradle A Different Drum Vero, a relatively unknown social network that launched three years ago, has been enjoying a surge in user engagement in recent weeks, a trend that may be tied to growing user discontent over recent changes to Instagram’s algorithm, along with an assortment of other objections that have been driving users away from the leading social platforms.Vero has rapidly moved up in the App Store and Google Play rankings, according to Adam Blacker, brand ambassador at Apptopia.”Once an app starts climbing the ranks, it becomes more visible and downloads are self-perpetuating,” he told TechNewsWorld.The visibility and media attention for this app in recent days should help it continue to gain in user awareness, Blacker said. Vero has several unique features that set it apart from other sites. It markets itself as a platform that values user privacy and trust. There are no advertisements, and it doesn’t share user data with advertisers. It does not employ algorithms. It allows users to send private messages to individuals or groups seamlessly.Users can organize their online connections by their relationship — designating them as close friends, friends, acquaintances or followers — and share posts with them accordingly.”User design and experience is important to Vero,” said spokesperson Chelsea Garecht.”The main thing we wanted to accomplish was getting people to understand the idea of close friends, friends, acquaintances — mirroring how people interact with each other in their real lives,” she told TechNewsWorld.The company’s recent growth spurt may be due in large part to the Cosplay community, which sees the value of no ads and quality photography.However, the growth has led to a number technical problems with the site, and Vero has acknowledged that “it’s been hard to keep up” with the surge in users over the weekend.If users keep the app open, it will catch up, Garecht advised, but she warned that the company has not yet adjusted to the sudden wave of growth.”It’s not where we want to be,” she said. “We are frustrated ourselves for our users, but are addressing the issue and appreciate the incredible encouragement we’ve seen from the community.”center_img David Jones is a freelance writer based in Essex County, New Jersey. He has written for Reuters, Bloomberg, Crain’s New York Business and The New York Times. Large shifts in social media usage can be a attributed in part to a herding mentality, particularly in younger ones, said Jim McGregor, principal analyst at Tirias Research.It is similar to the kinds of shifts that often occur in the restaurant business, he said, where a hot new eatery can move business away from an established competitor.”The challenging part is getting over the hump and reaching critical mass,” McGregor told TechNewsWorld. “You need critical mass to make a business plan work, and many of the social networks are still struggling with this.”Vero needs to be mindful of the technical issues that have been plaguing the site.”Millennials are pretty sensitive to this stuff, and this kind of thing could easily kill a service like this,” noted Rob Enderle, principal analyst at the Enderle Group.”However, it does showcase a growing weakness with all current social media properties,” he told TechNewsWorld. “People are incredibly fickle, and the increasing bad image from fake news surrounding most of the existing properties suggests they might move to something that Vero had promised and delivered — a more trustworthy experience.”last_img read more

first_imgGoing Viral Facebook on Monday began rolling out a new feature that’s bound to charm the political activists among its users.Called “Community Actions,” it lets Facebook members create an action page where they can describe what they’d like done, and set up a button that like-minded members can click to show their support, TechCrunch reported Sunday.The page will show the government agencies and officials notified about the action, as well as the number of its supporters.When you support an action, you’ll be able to see any of your friends who also support it, but no other names except the tagged public officials and agencies.Action pages also have discussion feeds, where people can leave comments, create fundraisers and organize Facebook Events or Call Your Rep campaigns.The feature will be rolled out gradually so that all Facebook members won’t have immediate access to it. It will be limited initially to the United States. Facebook’s motives behind Community Actions may be more than the social network trying to be a good citizen.”Facebook is always in search for the next feature that will make them or keep them relevant,” North said.”Right now, one of the things that’s energizing to people around the country and around the world is political dispute,” she continued.”We have a very polarized situation right now, and people are engaged in passionate political discussions. So it’s not a surprise that Facebook would take that social activity and turn it into a Facebook feature,” said North.For Facebook, everything is about public relations and marketing, maintained Carroll.”This Community Actions feature ticks both those boxes They’re trying to look like good citizens and do good in the community, but this is a marketing gold mine for Facebook,” he said. “They’re going to know something that you’re dedicated to. That’s powerful information for their business, which is selling their users.” Facebook is trying to keep Community Actions focused on getting government to act so it won’t be as freewheeling as some petition sites on the Web, wrote TechCrunch’s Josh Constine.Change.org, for example, has petitions that range from urging Maroon 5 against performing at the Super Bowl to docking congressional pay during government shutdowns, to removing Holocaust denial pages from Facebook, to providing air conditioning for UPS drivers.Facebook also aims to tamp down controversy by blocking Community Actions activists from tagging President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence as targets for their petitions.Some sample Community Actions cited by Constine, who got a sneak peek at the feature, included a Colorado group calling for the governor to put a moratorium on oil and gas drilling, citizens asking for a performing arts center, and a Philadelphia neighborhood association requesting that the city put in crosswalks near the library. In addition to Community Actions, Facebook has launched a number of civic-minded projects in the past, such as Town Hall and Candidate Info.Town Hall gives Facebook members a convenient way to locate, follow and contact their local, state and federal government officials.Candidate Info offers thousands of vertical videos. Candidates look their constituents straight in the camera’s eye and talk about themselves, their top policy priorities, and their biggest goal if they win office.”When you look at some of the things that have been rolled out in the last couple of years, they speak to Sheryl Sandberg’s political DNA,” North said.Facebook COO Sandberg worked in the administration of President Bill Clinton as chief of staff to Treasury Secretary Larry Summers. She was rumored to be a potential running mate for Hillary Clinton.”Facebook seems to be drawn to political activities and features. I don’t know if it comes from user data or from Sheryl Sandberg, and maybe Mark Zuckerberg,” said North.However, “Facebook needs to remember what draws people to Facebook is to share experiences and photos with friends and family, so it needs to be careful not to turn it into a hostile community,” she cautioned. No Tagging Trump Sandberg’s Political DNAcenter_img Staying Relevant John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John. An Infrastructure for Community Narrow or not, petitions arising in Community Actions probably have a better chance of capturing lots of eyeballs than competing petition sites.”Facebook activity has a lot better chance of going viral than a number of these do-gooder sites and would have a higher profile,” said John Carroll, a media analyst for WBUR in Boston.”A Facebook user has 2 billion people as a potential audience,” he told TechNewsWorld. “Change.org is a very active site, but it doesn’t get a critical mass behind its petitions all that often and relies on the mainstream media to give it an extra boost.”The media will play a role in the success of Community Actions petitions, maintained Karen North, director of the Annenberg Online Communities program at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.”The question is whether the media will deem Facebook petitions as newsworthy. If they do, then they become more relevant because they get broader attention,” she told TechNewsWorld.”It’s like Donald Trump’s tweets,” North added. “Most people don’t see them on Twitter. They read them in the news.” Community Actions appears to be part of a pledge made by Facebook two years ago to develop the social infrastructure for community.”For the past decade, Facebook has focused on connecting friends and families,” wrote CEO Mark Zuckerberg in a 6,000-word manifesto posted on the social network.”With that foundation, our next focus will be developing the social infrastructure for community — for supporting us, for keeping us safe, for informing us, for civic engagement, and for inclusion of all,” he added.”Our job at Facebook is to help people make the greatest positive impact while mitigating areas where technology and social media can contribute to divisiveness and isolation. Facebook is a work in progress, and we are dedicated to learning and improving,” Zuckerberg maintained.”We may not have the power to create the world we want immediately, but we can all start working on the long term today,” he added. “In times like these, the most important thing we at Facebook can do is develop the social infrastructure to give people the power to build a global community that works for all of us.”last_img read more

Source:https://share.kaiserpermanente.org/article/kaiser-permanente-jama-study-finds-10-year-follow-up-interval-after-negative-colonoscopies-is-associated-with-reduced-risk-of-colorectal-cancer-and-mortality/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 17 2018Ten years after a negative colonoscopy, Kaiser Permanente members had 46 percent lower risk of being diagnosed with and were 88 percent less likely to die from colorectal cancer compared with those who did not undergo colorectal cancer screening, according to a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.”Our study shows that following a colonoscopy with normal findings, there is a reduced risk of developing and dying from colorectal cancer for at least 10 years,” said study leader Jeffery Lee, MD, Kaiser Permanente gastroenterologist and research scientist at the Division of Research.Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerSugary drinks linked to cancer finds study”These findings suggest that physicians can feel confident following the guideline-recommended 10-year rescreening interval after a negative colonoscopy in which no colorectal cancer or polyps were found. There is now solid evidence supporting that recommendation.”The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force currently recommends colorectal cancer screening for adults at average risk between 50 and 75 years old, with either colonoscopy every 10 years, sigmoidoscopy every five years or fecal testing every year, assuming these tests are normal.Before this study, there was little evidence supporting the 10-year recommended screening interval after a colonoscopy with normal findings, Lee said. “That uncertainty was concerning because colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States.”To help address the evidence gap for when to rescreen, the retrospective study examined the long-term risk of colorectal cancer and related deaths after a negative colonoscopy in comparison to no screening in more than 1.25 million average-risk members of Kaiser Permanente in Northern California who were of recommended screening age during the 1998 to 2015 study period.”This large study is the first with a high enough number of average-risk individuals to evaluate cancer risks after colonoscopy examinations, compared with no screening,” said senior author Douglas Corley, MD, PhD, Kaiser Permanente gastroenterologist and research scientist with the Division of Research. “Such information provides greater certainty regarding the appropriate timing for rescreening after a negative colonoscopy.”Colon cancer is an active area of study at Kaiser Permanente. read more